Warm temperatures have finally hit Massachusetts and with the end of the school year approaching, parents in Pittsfield, Springfield, Boston, and everywhere in between are looking for family activities to keep their kids active.

We've got lots of ideas for you including fun family waterfall hikes near or in the Berkshires and a list of the best New England Water Parks, but now we've found the largest Splash Pad in the northeast and it's an easy drive from Berkshire County.

The Dinosaur Place at Nature's Art Village in Oakdale, Connecticut is a 60-acre outdoor adventure park home to over 50 life-sized dinosaurs on pristine nature trails. While all their other dino action is great, on a hot August summer day (trust me, they're coming) you can also check out New England’s largest Splash Pad. It's described as a unique zero-depth water park that has more than 30 water features like giant water spitting Stegosaurus, dueling T-Rex, and Velociprator water cannons, the massive dinosaur "rib cage" waterfall, and a flying Pteranodon that's triggered by ground sensors throughout the splash pad.

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In addition, there is a dinosaur-themed maze, two dinosaur caves, and Monty’s Playground, featuring the T-Rex Tower. 

The park is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, however, the splash pad and T-Rex Tower, are open between 10:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. every day.

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