I guess this fits from Forrest Gump, stupid is as stupid does.

The first time a car got stopped because of a fake plate. A 31-year-old guy named Justin Butchino recently got pulled over in western Massachusetts near Shelburne Falls, for a messed-up license plate. It was a temporary plate with such bad handwriting, they couldn't make out the numbers. It turned out the car wasn't registered, and his license was also expired. That was not the worst of it, while he was being arrested, they found drugs in his pocket.

Courtesy of Mass State Police

So they searched his car and found a family-size box of Frosted Flakes that were Full of drugs.
There was one big bag of cocaine inside and over 3,000 tiny bags of heroin that he was obviously planning to sell. They also found a purse packed with even more drugs. A guy in the passenger seat also got arrested. They're both facing drug trafficking charges.

The second arrest happened this past Monday around the Holyoke area. According to a news release Holyoke Police Department, 42-year-old John Collins of Chicopee was stopped on Sargeant Street by Maple Street and was arrested for allegedly operating a car without a license. After searching his vehicle during the arrest, police report that they found a .25 caliber firearm.

Holyoke Police Department

Collins faces the following charges:

Holyoke Police Department

 

Operating a motor vehicle with a revoked license
Unregistered Motor Vehicle
Uninsured Motor Vehicle
Carrying a firearm without a license
Possession of ammunition without a FID
Improper storage of a firearm

Get our free mobile app

50 Most Popular Chain Restaurants in America

YouGov investigated the most popular dining brands in the country, and Stacker compiled the list to give readers context on the findings. Read on to look through America's vast and divergent variety of restaurants—maybe you'll even find a favorite or two.

See How School Cafeteria Meals Have Changed Over the Past 100 Years

Using government and news reports, Stacker has traced the history of cafeteria meals from their inception to the present day, with data from news and government reports. Read on to see how various legal acts, food trends, and budget cuts have changed what kids are getting on their trays.

CHECK IT OUT: See the 100 most popular brands in America