No, the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge is not closing, and honestly, I did not know there was a second one in Vermont.

Norman Rockwell Museum of Vermont is planning to close its doors at the end of the year, almost half a century after its opening.

The museum recently reopened after being closed for months because of the pandemic. Business has been slow since the decline in tourism and travel during the last year.

Co-owner Colleen Schreiber said that they are trying to sell their retail stock but there is no definitive closing date for now.

AP News reported that Schreiber also cited personal health concerns as a reason why they are closing the museum.

Currently, the museum owners are trying to find a new home for the art collection in Vermont before the official closing, which Schreiber said will be before the fall.

Currently, the museum owners are trying to find a new home for the art collection in Vermont before the official closing, which Schreiber said will be before the fall.

Schreiber said the museum had been open for more than 40 years and it housed 2,000 of Rockwell’s commercial art works.

Lyle Jepson executive director of the Chamber & Economic Development for the Rutland Region.said,

“It would appear at this time there’s not a market for (the museum), which is a shame because the Norman Rocexecutive director of the Chamber & Economic Development for the Rutland Region. The Rockwell legacy is a Vermont signature".

Read On to find out about this piece of art.

Getty Images

The copy of Norman Rockwell's painting entitled "Breaking Home Ties," which has been hanging on display in the Norman Rockwell Museum is seen on April 7, 2006 in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

The painting that has been hanging in the museum was apparently forged by Donald Trachte Sr. in the 1970s and the original was found behind a fake wall in his home by his eldest son, Donald Trachte Jr. last month.

The original now hangs on display with the forged copy. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)e by Donald Trachte Sr. in the 1970s and the original was found behind a fake wall in his home by his eldest son, Donald Trachte Jr. last month. The original now hangs on display with the forged copy. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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