We start with some bad news. The Federal Government has officially pulled the plug on free at-home testing for COVID-19. Here's the good news. Bay State residents will STILL be able to obtain these tests FREE of charge. Governor Charlie Baker announced a total of over three and a half million tests will be equally distributed to cities and towns throughout Massachusetts as designated areas can submit requisitions until this Friday, September 16th.

Daisy-Daisy
Daisy-Daisy
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It is expected the tests will arrive in communities by mid-October, however, each municipality will receive a fixed amount of at-home tests depending on population. Requests can also be submitted for free personal protective equipment (PPE) including KN95, surgical, and children's masks. Plus, it was announced that over one million tests will be distributed to various food banks throughout the state.

Olena Hololobova
Olena Hololobova
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Governor Baker gave his reason as to why this process should continue from The Berkshires to Boston:

"This distribution of COVID-19 rapid antigen tests builds on our work over the past several years to partner with municipalities to ensure residents can protect themselves from the virus. Rapid tests, along with other resources like vaccines, boosters and treatments, provide residents with the tools they need to manage COVID-19."

LisLud
LisLud
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Statistics show the Bay State has distributed a total of over 25 million rapid COVID tests since December of 2021. On the local front, Berkshire Health Systems will provide the new bi-valent COVID-19 Pfizer and Moderna vaccines at the Pittsfield Testing and Vaccine Center on East Street at St. Luke's Square on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. On Friday, the North Adams Vaccine and Testing center will offer inoculations every Monday and Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. South county residents can make an appointment on Saturdays during the month of October at Fairview Hospital in Great Barrington.

Slowly but surely we are overcoming this pandemic: Let's keep it going!

(Some information obtained in this article courtesy of CBS-4 Boston, WBZ-TV)

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