The major snow event that will be impacting the northeast on Saturday will not be targeting the Berkshires but could be very severe in New England coastal communities. To say local communities like Great Barrington, Pittsfield, and North Adams will escape completely is not realistic.
The Berkshires will not get hit with a bomb cyclone that is a real possibility in the eastern part of the state, but locally we should get plenty of white stuff. AccuWeather is predicting up to 10 inches of snow. Other weather outlets are being more conservative in their snow accumulation predictions. Channel 13 out of Albany labeled the snowfall as “moderate” in the Berkshires and “light” in Albany. The National Weather Service is still not committing one way or the other when it comes to the total amount of snow regions should expect from this storm.
The latest NWS forecast is below.

Tonight
A slight chance of snow showers after 11pm. Increasing clouds, with a low around 16. South wind around 5 mph becoming calm after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Friday
Mostly cloudy, with a high near 27. Calm wind becoming northwest around 6 mph.
Friday Night
A chance of snow, mainly between midnight and 4am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 6. Wind chill values as low as -3. Calm wind becoming north 5 to 8 mph in the evening. Chance of precipitation is 30%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.
Saturday
A chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 14. Northwest wind 10 to 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 50%.
Saturday Night
A chance of snow before 1am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 0. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Sunday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 18.
Sunday Night
Mostly cloudy, with a low around 5.
Monday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 27.
Monday Night
Mostly clear, with a low around 8.
Tuesday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 33.
Tuesday Night
Mostly cloudy, with a low around 21.
Wednesday
Mostly cloudy, with a high near 43.

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